Bettas, Bettas, and More Bettas

Bettas, Bettas, and More Bettas!

5 notes

bettahorse:

Poor Clear has a tumor. I took these pictures last week, and it’s even bigger now. He’s still acting normal and eating fine, though. Hopefully it doesn’t bother him for a while. :(

Aw, I’m sorry. :( I had to deal with a tumor on a betta, too.

Filed under sick pet

47 notes

thebrackishtank:

South American Pufferfish/Amazon Pufferfish Genus: Colomesus Species: C. asellus Maximum Size: Reportedly up to 6”, 3” more common in home aquaria Aggression: Mid, Social Temperature: 72-82 F pH: 6-8 Hardness: 5-20 dH Brackish Tolerance: varies, 1.000-1.005 Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons Feeding: Flake, Pellets, and Algae Wafers likely accepted. Chopped Shellfish, pieces of frozen fish, even vegetable matter good for supplements. Eats some snail species
Notes: South American Pufferfish (SAPs) are unique as far as the commonly traded pufferfish go. Unlike the Carinotetraodon and Tetraodon puffers sold, these fish are social and can be kept in good sized groups. Indeed, they seem to be nervous when kept alone. A group of about 6 puffers is a good number for keeping aggression down. Other choices for tankmates are a bit limited. As confirmed fin nippers, it’s best not to keep them with easy-going fish like Corydoras catfish. The best tankmates are fast (like Glassfish) or spend the majority of the time hiding (like Synodontis catfish, in freshwater).
These fish are adapted to river life and appreciate higher water flow than other puffers. Filter flow of 6-10 times tank volume per hour is beneficial. Also as riverine fish, they are less dependent on caves than other puffers, though they do appreciate plants to hide in.
SAPs do hunt and eat snails, but specific species are certainly preferred. Pond snails (Physa sp.) are easiest, and Ramshorn Snails may be accepted. Malaysian Trumpet Snails may be too hard to eat and should be avoided. Feeding snails may help wear down their teeth, which grow very fast. Trimming may need to be performed at some point during the life of the fish (more information and instructions in the sources below).
SAPs seem to be prone to Ick infestations. Freely floating Ick protozoans cannot survive brackish conditions and thus it is better to keep these fish in slightly saline water. Like many puffers, SAPs are very sensitive to Ick Medications that contain Copper. Sources
The Nice Puffer: Colomesus asellus, the South American Puffer, Neale Monks
Colomesus asellus (Amazon Puffer), Seriously Fish
Fish Dentistry: Tooth Wear and Care in Predatory Fish, Kelly Jedlicki, Anthony Calfo
(Image Source)

thebrackishtank:

South American Pufferfish/Amazon Pufferfish
Genus: Colomesus
Species: C. asellus
Maximum Size: Reportedly up to 6”, 3” more common in home aquaria
Aggression: Mid, Social
Temperature: 72-82 F
pH: 6-8
Hardness: 5-20 dH
Brackish Tolerance: varies, 1.000-1.005
Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons
Feeding: Flake, Pellets, and Algae Wafers likely accepted. Chopped Shellfish, pieces of frozen fish, even vegetable matter good for supplements. Eats some snail species

Notes: South American Pufferfish (SAPs) are unique as far as the commonly traded pufferfish go. Unlike the Carinotetraodon and Tetraodon puffers sold, these fish are social and can be kept in good sized groups. Indeed, they seem to be nervous when kept alone. A group of about 6 puffers is a good number for keeping aggression down. Other choices for tankmates are a bit limited. As confirmed fin nippers, it’s best not to keep them with easy-going fish like Corydoras catfish. The best tankmates are fast (like Glassfish) or spend the majority of the time hiding (like Synodontis catfish, in freshwater).

These fish are adapted to river life and appreciate higher water flow than other puffers. Filter flow of 6-10 times tank volume per hour is beneficial. Also as riverine fish, they are less dependent on caves than other puffers, though they do appreciate plants to hide in.

SAPs do hunt and eat snails, but specific species are certainly preferred. Pond snails (Physa sp.) are easiest, and Ramshorn Snails may be accepted. Malaysian Trumpet Snails may be too hard to eat and should be avoided. Feeding snails may help wear down their teeth, which grow very fast. Trimming may need to be performed at some point during the life of the fish (more information and instructions in the sources below).

SAPs seem to be prone to Ick infestations. Freely floating Ick protozoans cannot survive brackish conditions and thus it is better to keep these fish in slightly saline water. Like many puffers, SAPs are very sensitive to Ick Medications that contain Copper.

Sources

The Nice Puffer: Colomesus asellus, the South American Puffer, Neale Monks

Colomesus asellus (Amazon Puffer), Seriously Fish

Fish Dentistry: Tooth Wear and Care in Predatory Fish, Kelly Jedlicki, Anthony Calfo

(Image Source)

(via aquariadise)

Filed under queue pufferfish care sheet caresheet

91 notes

scalestails:

It is with a heavy heart that I post this. My oldest betta, Colonel Custard, passed away two days ago.

He is the betta in my icon and was proof of my advancement as a fishkeeper. I had a rough start with fish, buying too many when I didn’t take care of what I have. But now I put my pets before anything else and care for them as best as I can.

I gave Colonel Custard all the care and love he could ever have wanted, and more. He was, now that I found his exact buy date, over 3 years old. He developed a tumor not too long ago and just slowed down. Eventually, he pineconed. A few nights later, he passed. I chose not to euthanize him because I just wanted him to pass peacefully in his tank, instead of stressing him out at all.

I can’t believe I still have the photo of him in the store. I took it to show my fiance how beautiful he was, and asked if I could spend the money on him. I set him up in a half filled 10gal on my floor for a month or two before I put him in the Fluval SPEC for a good while. Then he went in the kitchen in a 2.5gal and there he stayed until he died. I never thought his fins would have grown so long, or that he would be so beautiful even in his old age and with his fin biting.

I am melancholy, but not depressed. I know he had a good long life, I am only sad that it could not have been longer. Swim peacefully under the rainbow bridge, little guy.

I’m sorry for your loss. :( He was gorgeous.

Filed under pet loss pet death animal death

1 note

Okay, thank you! He’s been with my parents for a week so I’ve practically had my face in his tank for the two days I’ve…

No problem! You’re very welcome. Your boy’s a very handsome fish!

Aw, know what you mean. Me and my roomie are currently dog-sitting away from home so I only have long enough to feed and tidy up after our own pets for about 10 minutes after work. I’m already missing them. I’ve been making sure to still do my water changes on Keene’s tank to keep him good and healthy while away, too. We’re off the weekend, though, so we’ll be able to spend a few hours home with our own pets, at least. :)

Filed under theprocrastinaut

10 notes

theprocrastinaut:

iantojonesthebetta:

theprocrastinaut:

Seeking help from the fishblr community (or anyone who may just know fish) I think Gally here might be biting his tail/fins but I don’t know if its that or fin rot (I’ve never dealt with either issue before). If anyone can tell me if its one of those or something else as well as maybe how to help him get better that’d be so fantastic.
He’s currently in a 1 gallon tank, no filter/heater (I do plan on upgrading him asap).

Do you mean the splitting in the caudal? If that’s what you’re worried about, I don’t think you need to be — he’s a doubletail. Any of the slight raggedness I see also has clear growth around it, so there’s nothing to be concerned about there either. I don’t think, currently, you’re dealing with tail-biting or fin rot.

Not its the raggedness on the bottom of his tail and the U-shape up top that worries me, I don’t think that was there before. I’m pretty sure his fins were, for the most part, smooth all the way around. I could just be over thinking it, but I’d rather be safe than sorry. 

With long-finned varieties, it’s nearly impossible to keep them smooth. I don’t think it’s biting or fin rot, judging, again, by the clear growth around them. Biting tends to look a lot more ugly and jagged and fin rot tends to also be jagged and black (I’ve dealt with both fin rot and tail-biters). Large-finned varieties easily get their fins snagged or even blown out from simply swimming. I don’t see any cause for alarm at this present time looking at these pictures alone. :)

What is the decoration in the background? From what I see, it looks like it could be quite rough on betta fins. Bits of the ladder/mesh-thing are poking out, for instance. Decorations for bettas need to be so smooth that running panty hose over them won’t tear. Plants also need to be silk or real to best protect fins. By ensuring a safer environment, it’ll greatly lessen the chances of damage (while maintaining pristine water conditions will additionally lessen the chances of damage becoming infected).

18 notes

kotopoto:

Keene the betta fish!
I made this pic for iantojonesthebetta, who was so nice and patient with me about my fish troubles! Thanks to her now my own betta, Adolph (named after the fantastic manga by Osamu Tezuka and because he used to have a dark, moustache-like spot on top of his mouth xD) now has his own comfy home and his fins are healing properly.Keene is Melissa’s beautiful betta. He’s a real cutie and has a curious personality that I attempted to portray in the illustration, I hope I succeeded! Drawing this was so much fun, I want to draw more betta!! ♥♥
Drawn on Firealpaca, background and final touch on Photoshop.

kotopoto:

Keene the betta fish!

I made this pic for iantojonesthebetta, who was so nice and patient with me about my fish troubles! Thanks to her now my own betta, Adolph (named after the fantastic manga by Osamu Tezuka and because he used to have a dark, moustache-like spot on top of his mouth xD) now has his own comfy home and his fins are healing properly.

Keene is Melissa’s beautiful betta. He’s a real cutie and has a curious personality that I attempted to portray in the illustration, I hope I succeeded! Drawing this was so much fun, I want to draw more betta!! 

Drawn on Firealpaca, background and final touch on Photoshop.

10 notes

theprocrastinaut:

Seeking help from the fishblr community (or anyone who may just know fish) I think Gally here might be biting his tail/fins but I don’t know if its that or fin rot (I’ve never dealt with either issue before). If anyone can tell me if its one of those or something else as well as maybe how to help him get better that’d be so fantastic.
He’s currently in a 1 gallon tank, no filter/heater (I do plan on upgrading him asap).

Do you mean the splitting in the caudal? If that’s what you’re worried about, I don’t think you need to be — he’s a doubletail. Any of the slight raggedness I see also has clear growth around it, so there’s nothing to be concerned about there either. I don’t think, currently, you’re dealing with tail-biting or fin rot.